IMPACT OF SOIL EROSION ON AUSTRALIA'S RANGELANDS
Author
Pickup, G.
Publisher
Australian Rangeland Society
Publication Year
1990
Body

Soil erosion is a natural process which can be intensified by grazing, leading to substantial losses in pastoral productivity. It affects plant growth through reductions in soil moisture and nutrient availability, initial plant community condition prior to rainfall pulses, and changes in species. Erosion may involve both loss and redistribution of soil. Erosion patterns include grazing gradients, hillslope- stream network structures and erosion cell mosaics. Relict erosion patterns resulting from superfloods may also be present. The location and intensity of erosion varies with climate. Hillslopes are often more active during droughts while valley floors and channels are scoured in wet periods. Erosion assessment techniques need improvement if the "convenient myths" which allow people to ignore land degradation are to be laid to rest. There are four ways of dealing with erosion: information, education, legislation and risk management techniques.

Language
English
Resource Type
Text
Document Type
Conference Paper
Conference Name
6TH Australian Rangeland Society Conference
Keywords
Australia