How Time and Intensity of Clipping Affect Tall Bluebell
Author
Laycock, W. A.
Conrad, P. W.
Publisher
Society for Range Management
Publication Year
1969-09-01
Body

Removing 40, 70, and 100% of the foliage of tall bluebell plants for 4 consecutive years significantly reduced production, height, and stem number. Clipping during flowering and fruiting damaged plants more than treatment before flowering. Grazing systems for tall bluebell ranges should allow for deferment every two or three years to enable plants to maintain vigor and high production. This material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. The Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information. Migrated from OJS platform August 2020

Language
en
Resource Type
Text
Document Type
Journal Issue/Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
10.2307/3895869
Additional Information
Laycock, W. A., & Conrad, P. W. (1969). How time and intensity of clipping affect tall bluebell. Journal of Range Management, 22(5), 299-303.
IISN
0022-409X
OAI Identifier
oai:repository.arizona.edu:10150/649910
Journal Volume
22
Journal Number
5
Journal Pages
299-302
Journal Name
Journal of Range Management
Keywords
Moderate Use
Tall Bluebell
Stem Number
Fruiting
Mertensia arizonica
leonardii
Herbage Produciton
Pure Stads
mixed stand
Mud Creek Sheep Allotment
Herber
Carbohydrate Content
Foliage Removal
grazing systems
flowering
clipping
seasons
Time
height
intensity
utilization
vigor
production
deferment
Utah
Early Grazing