Relationship of soil and plant characteristics to erosion and runoff on pasture and range
Author
Hofmann, L., R. E. Ries
Publication Year
1969
Body

The relationship of soil and vegetation factors to soil loss and runoff were examined near Center, North Dakota on reclaimed mine-land pastures (Cabba Soils) and adjacent native rangeland (Sen Soils). Simulated rainfall was applied at a rate of 46 mm h⁻¹ to the plots on both soils. Runoff and soil loss were estimated in a standard manner for rainfall simulator runs. Eight treatments (reclaimed heavily grazed, reclaimed-moderately grazed, reclaimed-lightly grazed, reclaimed-burn, reclaimed-ungrazed, native grazed, native burn, and native ungrazed were tested for runoff. Native range sites were intensively grazed for 7 days while the reclaimed sites were heavily, moderately, and lightly grazed in late May. Dry matter, subsoil factors (bulk density, soil water, root weight, soil aggregation, and soil particle size), and surface factors (bare ground, litter ground cover, dry matter, plant height, roughness) were measured. Dry matter was measured after the final rainfall simulation.

Language
en
Keywords
erosion
runoff
pastures
rangelands
grazing
vegetation
Simulated rainfall
soil loss
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